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David Ratcliffe, President, Pink Elephant

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    Friday, January 30, 2015

    Leadership Learning At Pink15

    I’m looking forward to hearing the fruits of Dr. George Westerman’s research on how some IT leaders have achieved significant advantages for their businesses through the application of a digital mindset.

    I’ve been saying for a few years now that I don’t think our ITSM leaders have paid enough attention to the evolving world of IT services when it comes to the increasing effect of BYOB, cloud, mobile, social media and big data.

    You can see George deliver his session “Leading Digital: Turning Technology Into Business Transformation” on Monday morning.

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    Posted by David Ratcliffe on 01/30 at 01:21 AM
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    Friday, January 16, 2015

    The Next Challenge For ITSM Leaders

    The subject of “ITSM leadership” has been close to my heart for a few years now. So much so that we decided to launch a new annual event in 2012 - the “ITSM Leadership Forum” - to provide insights and advice to the people in ITSM charged with embracing a vision and leading their IT organization to enable positive business results. I felt as an ITSM community we had not done enough to stay ahead of the curve - which is one of the prime tenets of good leadership. Over the next two years, in 2013 and 2014, the event became a solid date in the calendar for many of our respected industry thinkers and practitioners. (Watch out for the 2015 program - to be published soon!)

    As social media emerged in 2010-2012 we seemed to miss the boat to provide leadership to our businesses. And now, in 2014 & 2015, it’s starting to look like Cyber Security & Resilience could be the next big thing many of us just watch happen! For example, how many organizations have actually changed policies for email as a result of the Sony hacking scandal?. Is that just Sony’s problem? Or could it happen here? Remember, the damage was less about theft or destruction of assets (money, data, etc.) and more about embarrassment and brand damage. It wasn’t the technology that actually wrote those mean and unprofessional emails! We wouldn’t let our people make such remarks in a public speech, or an interview, or in an external letter. So why is it allowed internally? I think it’s time we extended our policies for professional behaviour to the heretofore world of trusted internal emails!

    I can assure you that we aren’t waiting for the next ITSM Leadership Forum in August to reinforce good leadership practices. In just a few weeks many of us will be at Pink15, and the program there is rich in guidance for the aspiring, and incumbent, ITSM leader. We have two whole tracks aimed at leaders: “The 3 I’s of Leadership” and “CIO Forum”.

    Over the next couple of weeks I’ll profile some of the sessions in these tracks I feel are not to be missed. So come back here over the next few days and join me in whetting our collective appetites for Pink15!

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    Posted by David Ratcliffe on 01/16 at 03:31 PM
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    Monday, January 05, 2015

    Cyber Insecurity Comes As Much From People As From Technology

    These days I’m doing lots of reading about cyber insecurity - seems like there’s a never ending series of security breaches related to IT hitting the news every day. (I won’t bore you with the list - you know what I mean, they’ve been in all the papers!)

    For the layman is appears that our computer systems are just not robust and resilient enough. But when you scratch below the surface there’s more to it than that. We’ve always been good at blaming the computers when something goes wrong. IT folks seemed to have a free pass for years when their poor planning and lack of testing resulted in downtime. The reason for the outage, or screwed up data, was simply described as “... a computer error ...”

    But today we’re all a bit more knowledgeable and demanding as IT consumers and we won’t be fobbed off with that type of excuse anymore. We have our own devices and personal data, and the average person is their own IT organization - from strategist to support officer. However, I think we still put too much emphasis on the power and role of the infrastructure and have not yet fully realized the responsibilities of the users - that’s us!

    Cyber security is as much about human behaviour as it is about the latest security systems and technologies. For example, that smartphone you’re carrying around has a ton of security capabilities built into it, but if you leave the device laying around with no passcode to prevent unauthorized access .... well, you don’t need me to spell out how all that corporate data can be compromised.

    This whole human dimension on security is illustrated perfectly by Eugene Spafford, Professor of Computer Science at Purdue University when he says ...

    “Using encryption on the Internet is the equivalent of arranging an armored car to deliver credit card information from someone living in a cardboard box to someone living on a park bench.”

    Get the message now?

    As I said, I’m spending time researching this subject - in preparation for some very important new Pink events later this year. Starting with Pink15 - the 19th Annual IT Service Management Conference in Las Vegas next month - where we will, as usual, address a host of ITSM issues, best practices in Lean IT, and more. We’ll also be introducing news about our inaugural 1st Annual Pink Elephant Cyber Resilience Summits (in Washington D.C. and London, UK) in June.

    There’ll be some preliminary Cyber Resilience sessions at Pink15 to whet our appetite, including some advanced news of the new Cyber Resilience Best Practice from Axelos.

    I hope to see you in Las Vegas! Meanwhile, think about what you can do to keep your data and infrastructure safe. And when you hear news of the next high profile security breach, try to resist the temptation to giggle. Instead, think to yourself “How can I be sure that won’t happen to us?”

    You might not know what else to do to be more cyber secure, but you can always be more cyber resilient.

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    Posted by David Ratcliffe on 01/05 at 05:22 PM
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